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Cooperatives make a difference

Sound Consumer | November 2001

World coffee prices are currently less than half the Fair Trade price (determined by calculating the costs of production, plus a little to save for the next year). Thousands of families are forced to go without basic necessities. This has a devastating effect on child development and diminishes future earning capacity.

World coffee prices are currently less than half the Fair Trade price (determined by calculating the costs of production, plus a little to save for the next year). Thousands of families are forced to go without basic necessities. This has a devastating effect on child development and diminishes future earning capacity.

If the coffee you buy is not Fair Trade certified, it's likely that the money you spend is not getting to the coffee growers.

Fair Trade is about knowing the farmers who grow your coffee. PCC staff members have visited coffee farmers in Oaxaca, Mexico. In October 1999, organic farmer Juana Pezo Suero of Peru held a news conference at the PCC Greenlake store. In May, the Fair Trade certifying agency Transfair USA, named PCC Greenlake as Seattle's #1 Sustainable Coffee Retailer.

Cooperative principles such as voluntary membership, open discussion, and continuous education through seminars are non-tangible benefits that members create for our global community. In the village of Aguilayoc in Cusco, Peru, the first time that anyone cast a truly free and counted vote was in electing the board of their cooperative. PCC members purchasing certified Fair Trade coffees can take satisfaction in knowing their buying decisions support lasting change.

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