Bow Down to (the real) Washington

 

 

For those of you who don’t’ frequent the local bastions of big box grocery, you probably haven’t seen the obligatory displays of 14 Hands, Ch. Ste. Michelle, Sagelands, Hogue or Columbia Crest that serve to proclaim that it’s Washington Wine Month.  That’s right folks, it’s that time again, once more with feeling, as we rally the troops and drum up sales by celebrating the fact that way up here in the left hand corner, we’ve got it all. Anything California can do, we can (and shall) do too.

 

 

 That’s right. We can “make” wine. Take Washington grapes and make ‘em danged near indistinguishable from that Cali stuff. We can drop big dough on barrel regimens (a million bucks a year at one well-funded joint), get our grapes lip and gob-smacking ripe, polish our tannins as slick and smooth as Kenny G’s vibrato and boldly price our little start-up ventures with the best of the brazen. All that, and (unfortunately) not a lot in the bottle that says “Washington” except the fine print on the label. 

Don’t get me wrong. It’s not that I’m not crazy about Washington wine, when it’s Washington wine. Unfortunately, the spendy, trendy stuff that usually gets the press isn’t so much about what Washington tastes like as hat it takes to keep up with the Turleys, the Caymuses, the Opuses and the Screaming Eagles (Egos). What’s too commonly accepted as Washington “style” is usually not much more than a fairly well rendered California knock-off, at a correspondingly staggering tariff. Well, I’ve been to California a time or two, had a few bottles of vino from down that way, and I’m here to tell you, this isn’t there and that ain’t what Washington tastes like. 

Now for the good news. Washington Wine’s best days are yet to come. Already, there are plenty (and counting) of honest-to-goodness, made-at-the-47th-parallel wines that are an authentic expression of Washington fruit and terroir — which is to say that they actually taste like “here.” Even better, they tend to be made by modest people who care about putting something balanced in the bottle, making wines that play well with food, wines that refresh, that invite a second or third glass and that can be had at a price that makes sense for everyday people to drink every day. (Imagine, wines that go out of their way to be good, unpretentious, and that don’t require membership in a cult, a club or the 1% to buy!)

More and more, wine drinkers are discovering the incredible elegance and character that Washington wines can express, taking advantage of the natural acidity that’s possible with our warm days and cool nights, the diversity of soils and microclimates, as well as our state’s many and unique terroirs. Without the cloak of new oak and overripeness that the Parker panderers prize, these wines dance on the palate, and pair well with the dazzling, delicious array of foods in the local larder. Best yet, without the expense of new French oak cooperage and the surfeit of ego generally required to lay one’s wines at the feet of the Advocate, these humbly delicious wines are also quite affordable! Enjoy the art of the state — the best is waiting to be discovered, unrated and off the beaten path.

 

 

 

More about: local wine, Washington, wine

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