The World is Your Oyster ... Surrender to the Pink!



You just never know, do you? On one of those cold, dark, rainy evenings that define both the autumnal fading of the light in these parts, La Copine (a.k.a. “the Accomplice”) and I were settling into a pre-symphony repast at one of our favorite haunts. With a couple glasses of white wine (a flinty Petit Chablis and an Albariño from Rias Baixas) to awaken our palates while awaiting the arrival of  the first morsels of sustenance, we turned to the evening’s truly important decision: what bottle to both satisfy our thirsts and feed our souls?

Given that the evening’s first departure from the usual was already gracing our glasses, the stage was set for new adventures, the  taking of a left where one might general take a right...  Further,  the turn-up-the-collar nature of the evening, the creases in my gray matter would generally have had me drinking something red and Mediterranean, right from the proverbial “get.” But the Accomplice, possessing not only a more refined palate, but a willingness to step out of well-worn habits in just about everything, expressed a desire for something racy, bright and minerally. The resulting lovely, eclectic beverages were proving with each sip to be as delicious as they were from well off "the usual" route.  

“Aha!” “I love it!” “that’s perfect!” she said, pointing at the Domaine Tempier rose on the list. “And I’d love to try it with the oysters…"). Hmmmm, really? Well, yeah, I supposed, that wine is always fine-superb even, and great  rose is truly delicious in any season. But with oysters? Briny, cold Northwest meets sunny Provence? I wasn’t entirely convinced, but given that the Accomplice has an amazing sense for such things, I thought, “why not?” After all, Bandol sits just over the hill form the sea—and the rosé would be perfect with the pork chop we were set to share – even if it didn’t pan out with the oysters. 

It was splendido, on all counts, but especially with the briny bivalves. While the pale, pale salmon hue suggests a delicate wine, it’s actually quite rich, with hints of bright peach and pomegranate fruit accented with notes of spice. Zippy acidity and a kiss of salty sea air made the link of wine and oysters, the fruits of two far-flung seas, a luscious, if unexpected marriage.  

It just goes to show that you never know. Even when  you (or I should say I) think that you’re someone who thinks outside the proverbial box, there’s always another horizon -- and it’s always a good idea to try something seemingly out of the blue. And then there's the real moral of the story: always trust your accomplice…

 



More about: oysters, Rosé wine, wine, wine pairing

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