Tylophora

Also indexed as:Indian Ipecac, Tylophora asthmatica, Tylophora indica
Tylophora: Main Image
Common names:
Indian Ipecac
Botanical names:
Tylophora asthmatica, Tylophora indica

How It Works

The major constituent in tylophora is the alkaloid tylophorine. Laboratory research has shown this isolated plant extract exerts a strong anti-inflammatory action.8 Test tube studies suggest that tylophorine is able to interfere with the action of mast cells, which are key components in the process of inflammation.9 These actions seem to support tylophora’s traditional use as an antiasthmatic and antiallergic medication by Ayurvedic practitioners.

These historical and laboratory findings have been supported by several human clinical trials using differing preparations of tylophora, including the crude leaf, tincture, and capsule. One clinical trial with asthma sufferers, found that tylophora leaf (150 mg of the leaf by weight) chewed and swallowed daily in the early morning for six days led to moderate to complete relief of their asthma symptoms.10 In a follow-up trial with asthma patients, an alcoholic extract of crude tylophora leaves in 1 gram of glucose had comparable effects to that of chewing the crude leaf.11 Another trial found similar success in reducing asthma symptoms using a tylophora leaf powder (350 mg per day.)12 However, the tylophora was not as effective as a standard asthma drug combination. One double-blind trial failed to show any effect on asthma for tylophora.13

How to Use It

Tylophora leaf—200 to 400 mg of the dried leaf per day or 1 to 2 ml of tincture per day—can be used to treat asthma.14

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The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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