Rabbit

Also indexed as:Hare
Rabbit: Main Image

Storing

Store rabbit in the coldest part of the refrigerator. Raw rabbit can be refrigerated for two days. Cooked rabbit can be refrigerated for three days. Freeze fresh rabbit if you do not plan to cook it within two days after purchase. Wrap rabbit parts separately in foil or freezer bags before freezing, and label for ease in selecting just the right number of parts to thaw for a single meal. Be sure to press the air out of the package before freezing. You may also freeze rabbit in its original wrapping. Uncooked rabbit may be kept frozen for 6 to 12 months, depending on the cut. Cooked parts may be frozen in the same way as fresh, unless in a dish made with a sauce or gravy. In that case, pack in a rigid container with a tight-fitting lid. Thaw uncooked rabbit in the refrigerator or in cold water. Never thaw rabbit at room temperature. In the refrigerator, a whole rabbit (4 pounds) (1,816g) should thaw within 24 hours; cut-up parts require 3 to 9 hours, depending on the size and number of parts. To thaw rabbit in cold water, leave the rabbit in its original wrapping or place it in a watertight plastic bag. Change the water often. A whole rabbit should thaw in about 1 1/2 to 2 hours. For quick thawing of uncooked or cooked rabbit, use the microwave. Thawing time will vary according to whether you’re thawing a whole rabbit or parts, and the number of parts frozen together. Use the Defrost or Medium-Low setting, according to the manufacturer’s directions. Turn rabbit and separate the parts as they thaw, taking care the rabbit does not begin to cook. Repeat as needed.

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The information presented in the Food Guide is for informational purposes only and was created by a team of US–registered dietitians and food experts. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements, making dietary changes, or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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